Our series of courses and seminars provide training and technical skills in the repair and maintenance of historic and traditionally built structures. They are aimed at people wishing to upskill, train or develop practical knowledge in the field of the historic built environment, including architects, surveyors, planners, project managers and supervisors, and anyone with a general interest in historic buildings and materials.

Most courses and seminars take place over a half or full day, and consist of a mixture of lectures and practical demonstrations, sometimes including a site visit in Dublin city centre to inspect conservation works in progress. Presently, all seminars and lectures are taking place online via the Zoom platform.

Courses are rated for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland and The Society of Chartered Surveyors, and most events are considered applicable for CPD by other professional bodies. Participants are issued with a certificate of attendance upon request.

Sign up to our Newsletter on the home page for regular updates on Courses, Seminars and Events.

 

CURRENT SEMINARS

Structural Repair of Historic Buildings
with Ian Hume, structural engineer and former Chief Engineer with English Heritage

Thursday 10th September 2020
Morning webinar via Zoom: 10:00 - 13:00

Full details below

Structural Repair of Historic Buildings

Half-day Webinar

Led by Ian Hume, Structural Engineer, former Chief Engineer, English Heritage
DIC, CEng, MIStructE, DiplConsAA, IHBC

Date: Thursday 10th September 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00
(webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar via Zoom

BOOK NOW

Another Opportunity...
Due to unprecedented demand and a waiting list for our 'real-world' seminar hosted with Ian Hume in January 2020, we have decided to re-run the event via a Zoom webinar this coming September. The format will be slightly modified to account for the digital format. Full details below.

Webinar Content
This stimulating morning of lectures will focus on best practice repair and structural consolidation of historic buildings. It will explore considered engineering principles that promote the retention of historic fabric and special character, based on correct identification of structural defects and their causes. Not all defective historic buildings are as hazardous as they seem, requiring careful analysis and alternative approaches to repairs to consolidate apparently unstable structures and their elements. Various permanent repair methodologies which might be applied to historic buildings will be discussed, including debate about the merits of hidden repairs as against more obvious repairs.

Topics of discussion will include:

Conservation philosophy - applying the five basic principles of conservation in a challenging environment.

Conservation engineering techniques – choosing tried and tested solutions versus new methods.

Structural monitoring - diagnosing problems and identifying correct solutions through different methods of monitoring.

Maintenance – learning the rules of regular inspection and works regimes. 

Role of Conservation Engineer - interacting with owners, occupiers, planning and conservation authorities, and other members of the team, and having the confidence and expertise to do what is right for the building.

More details below

Wall propping in a Georgian huse, c.1790, Mountjoy Square, Dublin

Wall propping in a Georgian huse, c.1790, Mountjoy Square, Dublin

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

09.45 – 10:00  Webinar open for admittance

10:00 – 13:00  3x presentation lectures with Q&A after each session
                      
  2x 10-minute breaks

Topics

Philosophy of conservation

Inspection of historic buildings

Safety on historic sites

Scaffolding and temporary works for historic buildings

Understanding the structure and what does it have to say to you?

How does a building’s history affect your thinking?

Structural monitoring and load testing

Floor loadings and their impact on historic buildings

Tying, repairs and other low intervention repair methods

Multipe case studies

BOOK NOW

 

Ian Hume Biography

Ian Hume is a leading conservation accredited engineer who has been involved in the conservation of historic buildings across the UK for 40 years. He served as Chief Engineer of the Conservation Engineering team of English Heritage from 1988 to 1998, followed by extensive work in private practice and visiting lecturing in West Dean College and UK universities. Major conservation works undertaken under Ian Hume’s instruction have included the Mausoleum at Castle Howard, the Ironbridge and Leigh Court barn in Worcestershire. He lectures frequently on conservation engineering and is an active member of the UK Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE). 

Ian Hume

Ian Hume

PREVIOUS EVENTS

Historic Floor Surfaces
Approaches to Repair, Cleaning & Conservation 

ONLINE SEMINAR
Live via Zoom               CONCLUDED

DATE: Thursday 6th August 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 GMT
(online webinar open for registration from 09:45)

Format: Short Introduction
               3x 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A
               (plus 2x 10-minute breaks)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar with selected Q&A



SEMINAR CONTENT

This live online morning seminar will explore the composition, cleaning and conservation of historic floor surfaces under the guidance of a leading conservator, Darren McClean, of McLean Conservation Associates, Glasgow.

Floors add considerably to the character of historic buildings and are often an important decorative feature, in addition to serving practical and structural functions. Floors bear the brunt of wear and tear, especially in public buildings, and can suffer considerably from service installations and changes to layout and room functions. Their repair can be a challenge where original materials are no longer available, where the original method of laying is uncertain, or where skills may be limited or unavailable.

Darren McLean will explore many types of historic floor surfaces, starting with stylistic influences and materials, moving through types of decay and damage, to approaches to careful repair, cleaning and appropriate replication where necessary. Three 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A will explore:

- Timber Floors

- Stone Floors

- Tile/Mosaic Floors

TUTOR BIOGRAPHY

Darren McLean is a respected conservator with a wealth of experience in building conservation, historic material repair, cleaning and consolidation. He has worked as a practitioner of traditional skills, an educator and an adviser, having started his conservation career with an apprenticeship in carpentry, followed some years later with an MSc in Building Conservation.

In 2010 Darren formed Timber & Lime Conservation, where he has focused on the conservation and repair of historic buildings. In 2018, he was appointed an Adjunct Assistant Professor at The University of Hong Kong to teach materials and techniques in the postgraduate conservation curriculum. He is also a guest lecturer in Strathclyde University’s Building Conservation MSc.

Latterly, Darren started McLean Conservation Associates to provide consultancy in various heritage services. In addition to traditional Scottish buildings, Darren has special interest in traditional Chinese architecture.

Clients include Historic Environment Scotland, Sir Lachlan McLean of Duart Castle, The Peter Pan Trust, Glasgow City Heritage Trust, The Prince's Trust, The National Trust for Scotland, Yangon Heritage Trust, Australian Aid, HKICON.

 

Darren McClean

Darren McClean

Historic Interiors - Understanding Materials & Finishes
Practical Approaches to Conservation 

ONLINE SEMINAR
Live via Zoom            CONCLUDED

Date: Thursday 30th July 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 GMT
(online webinar open for registration from 09:30)

Format: Short Introduction
               3x 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A
               (plus 2x 10-minute breaks)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar with selected Q&A

SEMINAR CONTENT

This live online morning seminar led by conservator, Darren McClean, of McLean Conservation Associates, Glasgow, will explore the elements, materials and finishes used in historic interiors and explore approaches to their repair and conservation.

Historic interiors of the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries, ranging from domestic to commercial, are commonly described in terms of style and architectural influences. The materials from which they are assembled and the technological innovations that brought them into being are less often explored, while their repair and conservation can be a challenge to the modern householder, contractor and specifier.

Darren McLean will explore the many facets of historic interiors through documentary sources and a variety of case studies with the aim of providing a greater understanding of ‘what you're looking at’ when approaching the conservation or refurbishment of an old interior.

Themes covered over three 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A will include:

- Plaster (Lime, Gypsum, flat, run cornices, cast architectural and decorative, Scagliola)

- Timber (Doors, Floors, walls, species, sources)

- Other wall surfaces (Lincrusta, Anaglypta)

- Stone (Floors, mantles, carvings)

- Glass

- Tile / Mosaic

- Carpet

- Linoleum

- Paint

- Wallpaper

- Electricity

- Gas

- Bathrooms

1840s interior, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin

1840s interior, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin

Thermal Upgrading of Historic Buildings
Building Fabric and Energy Service Solutions

Half-day Seminar

with Ecological Building Systems, Nilan Ireland & UK and DB Plaster

Date: Wednesday 11th March 2020

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures and demonstration

 

SEMINAR CONTENT

This half-day seminar will explore principles and technical solutions for thermally upgrading historic buildings. The correct application of compatible, vapour-permeable materials and well-designed space heating and air handling systems is essential to work with and respect the built fabric and character of traditionally-built structures, both protected and non-protected.

There is a growing – often bewildering – array of products and methodologies for undertaking thermal upgrading, especially in the context of advancing climate change and a rapidly evolving regulatory framework. This requires a practical understanding among specifiers and building owners/managers of how historic buildings function and applicable renewable energy and M&E solutions for sensitive upgrading.

Leading speakers from Ecological Building Systems, Nilan Ireland & UK, and DB Plaster will explore these themes through lectures, case studies and practical demonstration.

DB Plaster demonstrating installation of Calsitherm climate board in 18 Ormond Quay Upper

DB Plaster demonstrating installation of Calsitherm climate board in 18 Ormond Quay Upper

LEAD SPEAKERS

Nilan Ireland & UK develops and manufactures premium-quality, energy-saving ventilation and heat pump solutions that are beneficial to the environment and provide a healthy indoor climate and low-level energy consumption. The Ireland division is headed by Maurice Falvey, a mechanical engineer with many years’ experience in renewable technologies. He has attended and completed a European-certified passive designer’s course to enhance understanding of building concepts, and has undertaken further training in renewable energies abroad in Germany, Denmark and Sweden.

Niall Crosson is Group Technical Manager at Ecological Building Systems, a leading Irish company supplying products and materials for low energy sustainable buildings. He is a Certified Passivhaus Consultant and a member of the Board of Directors of the Irish Green Building Council. He provides guidance on a number of national standard committees and to many award-winning low-energy projects in Ireland and the UK. He has also co-authored and authored chapters for a number of low energy building publications including The Passivhaus Handbook and The Passivhaus Designers Manual. Niall provides regular technical contributions to a number of construction publications including The Journal of the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland.

DB Plaster - Natural Building Solutions are specialists in lime plaster and natural insulation with over 15 years contracting experience. Dublin-based, the firm offers a nationwide consulting and production service with projects completed from Tralee, Co. Kerry to Strangford, Co Down, as well as offering training services in insulation board installation. David Broderick has collaborated in the design of a Fetac-accredited training course in Thermal Insulation Installation and delivers this three-day course at various locations around Ireland on behalf of Greenworks.ie.

 

PROGRAMME

09:15      Registration

09:30     Welcome & Introduction

09:40     Role of Thermal Plasters in the Thermal Upgrade of Historic Buildings
               Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager, Ecological Building Systems

10:40     Two case studies of Calsitherm application from the customer standpoint
              Graham Hickey, Conservation Director, Dublin Civic Trust

              Questions & Answers

11:00      Tea/Coffee Refreshments

11:30      Thermal Plaster Application Demonstration
              Dave Broderick, DB Plaster

12:00     Adapting renewable energy solutions/M&E in heritage buildings
              Maurice Falvey, Nilan Ireland & UK

13:00     Questions & Answers

              Close

Previous Ecological Buildings Systems lecture

Previous Ecological Buildings Systems lecture

History and Conservation of Traditional Roofing

Half-day Seminar

Date: Wednesday 13th November 2019   

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures 

This half-day seminar will focus on the historic evolution, conservation, repair and thermal upgrading of traditional roofing, with an emphasis on urban and slate-clad roofs of the 18th and 19th centuries. Roofs are a critical element in historic structures, both protected and non-protected, providing weathering, structural stability and architectural interest. Their form and detailing is especially important in historic streetscapes where massing and authentic finishes are a key townscape component, not least in Architectural Conservation Areas. Best practice approaches to roof repair and upgrading are vital to ensure the overall health and special interest of older buildings is maintained.  

The seminar programme will feature a variety of case studies ranging from churches and terraced houses to large-scale country mansions. The seminar will include an on-location practical demonstration exploring the properties of natural slate, slate grading, sizing and cutting.

PROGRAMME

09:30     Welcome & Introduction
               Catríona Ryan, Principal Officer, Built Heritage Policy Unit
               Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht 

09:40     History of Traditional Roofing in Ireland  
               Nicki Matthews, Senior Architect, Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

10:15       Three Case Studies: Approaches to Roof Repair and Conservation
               Kevin Blackwood, Architect, Blackwood Associates, Conservation Grade I

10:50     Questions & Answers      

11:00     Tea/coffee refreshments

11:30      St Patrick’s Cathedral – Fixing The Roof While The Sun Is Shining
              John Beauchamp, MRIBA MRIAI SCA AABC IHBC, RIAI Conservation Grade I
              Director, Benjamin+Beauchamp Architects

              Questions & Answers

12:10      Practical Approaches to Roof Repair
              Ken O’Reilly, Ken O’Reilly Roofing  

12:35      Demonstration of slate grading cutting and leading - Interactive discussion encouraged
               Ken O’Reilly, Ken O’Reilly Roofing  

13:00     Close

© Stephen Farrell Photography

© Stephen Farrell Photography

History, Repair and Cleaning of Interior Plasterwork 

Half-day Seminar

Date: Tuesday 19th November   

Time: 09:45 – 13:00
(registration from 09:30 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures with indoor demonstrations  

This half-day seminar focuses on the history and repair of interior plasterwork, both decorative work and flatwork. The majority of historic interiors in Ireland are finished in plain lime plaster: composed of ‘two  and three-coat work’ on walls and lath-and-plaster formulations on ceilings. This plasterwork comprises the essential fabric of our commonplace building stock – especially domestic, commercial, institutional and religious buildings – the repair of which is important to understand to ensure the protection of special character. Additionally, Ireland has a fine tradition of decorative plasterwork, ranging from modest ceiling roses and cornices, to elaborate ceiling and wall stuccowork, which requires specialist knowledge and skill to undertake its cleaning, repair and restoration.

The morning seminar will be led by Andrew Smith of Smith & Henderson Stuccodores and Frank Keohane, Chartered Building Surveyor, SCSI Grade I Conservation Surveyor. It will feature a mixture of lectures, casting demonstrations and on-site plaster cleaning in 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

PROGRAMME

Session 1: 09:45 – 11:00

Welcome & Introduction

Composition and Repair of Historic Plaster and Flatwork
Frank Keohane, Chartered Building Surveyor 

Topics: Two and three-coat work, masonry substrates, embedded timbers, lath-and-plaster studwork and ceilings, plaster mixes, thermal plasters and general upgrading, plaster specification

Questions & Answers

11:00 Tea/Coffee refreshments

Session 2 11:30 - 13:00

History of Decorative Plaster and Approaches to Repair and Conservation
Andrew Smith, Stuccodore

Topics: Rococo and neoclassical styles, integrated decorative interiors, composition of decorative plaster, paint specification, paint removal and plaster cleaning, casting and freehand work

Demonstration: Bench casting of plaster elements, and paint removal from original rococo cornice in 18 Ormond Quay.

13:00 Close

Repair challenge presented by failure of decorative plaster ceiling

Repair challenge presented by failure of decorative plaster ceiling

Workshop seminar and visit
Lambstongue Window Conservation Specialists

Half-Day Seminar

Date: Thursday 21st November

Time: 10:00 - 13:00
(registration from 09:45 at the front door)

Location: Lambstongue workshop, G7, Chapelizod Industrial Estate, Chapelizod, Dublin 20
(attendees to provide their own transport or car-pool)  

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor presentations and workshop inspection

This morning seminar will provide a stimulating opportunity to visit one of the largest building conservation workshops in Ireland, at the headquarters of Lambstongue, historic window specialists, in Chapelizod.

Lambstongue specialises in the repair and manufacture of traditional timber and metal windows, rooflights and glazed screens with a strong design and conservation sensibility. In addition to the firm’s specialisation in traditional joinery, it has pioneered expertise in the conservation and thermal upgrading of metal doors and windows, working with steel, cast-iron, bronze and leadwork. It has recently completed an extensive contract for sash window repair and secondary glazing in Leinster House, with current work including Iveagh House, Royal College of Surgeons and the Four Courts.

This is a rare opportunity to explore their workshop, with lecture-style presentations, demonstrations and craft inspections, including: traditional joinery, sash window repair, glazing, stained glass and leadwork, working with bronze, steel and aluminium, and thermal upgrading.

Mid-morning refreshments provided. Lunch is not included.

 

Directions
Lambstongue's workshop is located in Unit G7 in the Chapelizod Industrial Estate, Dublin 20, the entrance of which is located on the Chapelizod Road almost opposite St. Patrick's National School. Unit G7 is located at the far end (eastern end) of the estate where parking is available.

The estate is served by Dublin Bus routes 25, 26, 66, 66A, 66B and 67 which have a stop directly at the entrance to the estate.

Shop windows for 18 Ormond Quay Upper under manufacture by Lambstongue

Shop windows for 18 Ormond Quay Upper under manufacture by Lambstongue

Repair & Conservation of Traditional Ironwork

Half-day Seminar

Date: Wednesday 6th November 2019   

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures and exterior demonstration

This half-day seminar will provide a unique opportunity to learn from one of Ireland’s leading traditional blacksmiths, Paul Devlin of Pristine Ironwork, in an engaging morning of lectures and a live blacksmithing demonstration. Topics discussed will include the properties of wrought and cast-iron, common ironwork defects, approaches to repair and conservation, and specification of paint finishes.

The event will include practical and technical demonstration from Paul Devlin and expert advice from Frank Keohane, an experienced conservation surveyor and author of Dublin Civic Trust’s ‘Irish Period Houses: A Conservation Guidance Manual’.    

 

Traditional blacksmithing with Paul Devlin

Traditional blacksmithing with Paul Devlin

Repair and cleaning of historic facades and masonry with PMAC conservation contractors 

Half-day Seminar

Date: Friday 11th October 2019

Time: 09:45 – 13:00
(registration from 09:30 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Primarily indoor lectures with some exterior demonstrations

Details
This half-day seminar is hosted by Dublin Civic Trust in conjunction with PMAC specialist cleaning, conservation and restoration contractors. PMAC a leading Irish company in the field of sensitive repair and cleaning of historic masonry elements, from stone, brick and render, to entire historic building facades including The Gresham Hotel, O’Connell Bridge, churches and shopfronts. PMAC is a registered Heritage Contractor and an ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management System certified company.

The event will include presentation-led lectures by Peter MacNamara, PMAC Managing Director,
and a live outdoor demonstration of specialist cleaning techniques.

 
PROGRAMME

09:45 - 11:00
Identification of masonry substrates and pollution/contamination types  

Appropriate cleaning solutions: water, steam, chemical and abrasive options

Historic building facade case studies

Managing graffiti on historic surfaces: cleaning solutions, repellent coats

Questions & Answers

11:00
Tea/Coffee refreshments

11:30 - 13:00
Stone, brick and concrete repair

Concrete and marble floors

Live demonstration of cleaning solutions (outside)

PMAC removing contamination from historic Drumcondra bridge

PMAC removing contamination from historic Drumcondra bridge

History and Conservation of Traditional Brickwork

Half-day Seminar

Date: Wednesday 2nd October 2019  

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures 

Details
This half-day seminar will focus on the history, use and repair of brick as a building material in historic structures. Brick is a core constituent in the built heritage of Dublin and forms an important part of traditional construction in many parts of Ireland.

Understanding of its origins, its make-up and use in historic buildings is essential to ensure proper standards of repair and conservation. This morning seminar will feature leading traditional brick expert speakers and practioners, including a live demonstration of traditional brick pointing techniques.


PROGRAMME

09:30    
Welcome & Introduction

09:40    
An Introduction to Ireland's Brickmaking History 
Susan Roundtree, retired Conservation Architect
& author of upcoming gazetteer on Irish brickwork (to be published 2020)

10:20    
Brick construction: common attributes, defects and approaches to conservation
James Kelly, Conservation Architect, Kelly & Cogan Architects

10:50    
Questions & Answers      

11:00
Tea/coffee refreshments

11:30
Techniques for repair and manufacture of brick, terracotta and application of traditional brick pointing.
Including multiple case studies.
Shane Nolan, Nolan Group conservation contractors

12:15    
Questions & Answers

12:25    
Live brick pointing demonstration with Nolan Group
Interactive discussion encouraged

13:00    
Close

 

Traditional Irish wigging by Nolans Group

Traditional Irish wigging by Nolans Group

The Nineteenth-Century Decorative Interior

Half-Day Seminar


Date: Tuesday 14th May 2019

Time: 09.15 - 13.30                                                                   

Location: Dublin Civic Trust, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 1

Tickets: €65

FULLY BOOKED

 

This half-day seminar, hosted in the newly decorated 1840s interiors of 18 Ormond Quay Upper, explores the evolution of Dublin’s decorative interiors as they transitioned from the age of Regency to the Victorian period. An array of expert speakers will focus on domestic and ‘merchant’ interiors of the 1820-1870 era, with topics ranging from wallpaper, furnishing, material culture and the economics of domestic development. The seminar coincides with the launch of a new range of historic Irish wallpapers by David Skinner, wallpaper specialist, which will be exhibited later in June in the ground floor of 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

The seminar includes a tour of 18 Ormond Quay and tea/coffee refreshments.

See programme below.

Sample of David Skinner wallpaper, originally patented in 1841 by James Boswell, paper-stainer of Bachelors Walk, Dublin

Sample of David Skinner wallpaper, originally patented in 1841 by James Boswell, paper-stainer of Bachelors Walk, Dublin

PROGRAMME


09.15 - 09.30
Registration

09.30                                   
History of Irish wallpapers – fashion and style
David Skinner, Historic Wallpaper Specialist   

10.00                                   
Decorative interiors 1830-1870 - applying the principles to 18 Ormond Quay Upper
Graham Hickey, Conservation Director, Dublin Civic Trust

10.30                                    
The Dublin shop, the Wide Streets Commission and the merchant interior                                      
Sarah Foster, Lecturer in the history of design,
CIT Crawford College of Art & Design, Cork

11:00                                    
Tea/Coffee Break

11.30                                    
Dressing the domestic interior - nineteenth-century Irish furniture makers
George Williams, Antique Dealer and Conservator

12.00                                    
System decorating and the early-nineteenth century interior
Conor Lucey, Assistant Professor, School of Art History and Cultural Policy, UCD

12:30                                    
The Dublin 'paper-stainers'  
David Skinner, Historic Wallpaper Specialist                                                     

13:00                                    
Discussion & Tour of 18 Ormond Quay Upper

Greek revival, cast-iron chimneypiece, 18 Ormond Quay Upper

Greek revival, cast-iron chimneypiece, 18 Ormond Quay Upper

SPEAKERS

David Skinner is Ireland’s leading expert on traditional wallpapers. For over twenty years his firm has been researching and printing Irish historic wallpapers, and is constantly adding to a collection of patterns and borders reproduced from original designs found in Irish houses of the Georgian and Victorian periods. David’s unique archive of Irish period papers is the source of the collection which includes classic damasks, a late nineteenth-century pattern of shamrocks, Regency stripes, Gothic patterns and more – all of which can be printed in their original colourings, or may be custom coloured to customers’ specifications. David is author of the seminal publication Wallpaper In Ireland 1700-1900 by Churchill House Press, and he is providing the historic wallpapers for 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

Graham Hickey is Conservation Director at Dublin Civic Trust. He is a graduate of Dublin Institute of Technology and a post-graduate of Applied Building Repair and Conservation from Trinity College Dublin, where his study focused on the historic development and reconstruction of the State Apartments at Dublin Castle in the period 1941-1968, subsequently contributing a chapter to the recent OPW publication Making Majesty: The Throne Room At Dublin Castle and its high William IV decoration. He was a contributor to the Architecture 1600-2000 volume of the Art and Architecture of Ireland project, focusing on nineteenth-century urban domestic development, and holds a particular interest in the architectural and decorative period 1830-1850. He is a regular writer for The Sunday Times on architectural heritage and the development of Dublin city.

Sarah Foster is Lecturer in the history and theory of design at the CIT Crawford College of Art & Design in Cork. Her paper today draws on her Royal College of Art dissertation Going Shopping in Georgian Dublin: luxury goods and the negotiation of national identity; this used a wide range of primary sources to reconstruct shopping in Dublin between 1770 and 1810, and frame it in relation to consumption and ‘patriot’ identity. She has lectured and published widely on Irish and European material culture and also acts as a peer reviewer for American, Irish and British publishers.

George Williams is an antique dealer and conservator who specialises in the furnishings and lifestyles of the Irish Georgian and Regency periods. George began his career working as a porter for his father while he was still at school and witnessed many of the contents sales of the great Irish country houses of the 20th century. This gave him first-hand experience of the furnishings of these great houses and how the furniture was displayed and constructed. In 1987 he established George Williams Antiques, and two years later bought an early 19th-century house on Capel Street which he painstakingly restored using only period materials salvaged from other houses and skips. From here, he ran George Williams Antiques before moving the business to Co Meath. George has an unrivalled knowledge of 18th and 19th-century Irish furniture and interior design and delivers many lectures on the subject. His wife Maggy is an Irish art consultant and George Williams Antiques provides advice on buying and selling antique furniture and works of art, current valuations. He offers a full range of antique restoration and upholstery services and also holds training courses on the subjects.  

Conor Lucey is Assistant Professor in the School of Art History and Cultural Policy at UCD, and President of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. He sits on the committees of the Irish Architectural Archive and the Irish Committee for Historical Sciences. Conor is an architectural and design historian with interests in a number of fields, including urban domestic architecture of the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world; the contested relationship between architectural design and building production; and the decorative interior in Europe, 1660-1840. His latest book, Building Reputations: Architecture and the Artisan, 1750-1830 was published by Manchester University Press, and grant-aided by the National University of Ireland and an SAH/Mellon Author Award of the Society of Architectural Historians.

Parnell Square and Rotunda Hospital Conference 2018

Evaluating the Historic Urban Landscape


Date: Thursday 29th November 2018

Time: 09.00 - 16.40                                                                     

Location: The Pillar Room, Rotunda Hospital
Cavendish Row, Parnell Square East, Dublin 1

Ticket: €75
Ticket with CPD Certificate: €100
Ticket Student/Senior Citizen: €40 (proof required on the day)

Conference Theme

Dublin Civic Trust is pleased to announce details of its winter 2018 conference focusing on the history, development and future potential of Parnell Square and the Rotunda Hospital complex. The event takes place in the magnificent 18th-century setting of the little-known Pillar Room of the Rotunda Hospital, located beneath The Gate Theatre.

Sited at the northern end of O’Connell Street, Parnell Square is Dublin’s first Georgian square, developed c.1755-1795 as a series of residential terraces enclosing the grounds of the Rotunda Hospital. The square has its origins in the establishment, in 1749, of the New Pleasure Gardens, the fundraising enterprise of the Rotunda Hospital’s founder Dr Bartholomew Mosse, who attracted aristocratic patronage through annual subscriptions and concert events. The maternity hospital opened in 1757, built to the design of leading architect Richard Castle. This was followed by the construction of the great Rotunda entertaining room in the 1760s and the establishment of the New Assembly Rooms designed by Frederick Trench and Richard Johnston in the 1780s: the latter now forming part of The Gate Theatre.

The mansions surrounding the square contain some of the best examples of 18th-century interiors and decorative plasterwork in the city, complemented by modern cultural institutions including the Dublin City Gallery - The Hugh Lane. Within this historic setting, the Rotunda Hospital continues to operate its original function as a leading provider of maternity services, with various plans afoot to expand facilities or move to an alternative site in the longer term.

 

Conference Proceedings

The aim of the conference is to highlight the history and development of the square and its houses, the hospital buildings, its entertaining rooms and associated landscape. These elements in their surviving form compose an 18th-century urban complex of international significance, comprising rare early examples of a purpose-built maternity hospital, associated public rooms and remains of a unique designed landscape. Unlike other lost pleasure gardens in Europe, the built setting and relationship of this landscape to its original Georgian environment remains remarkably intact, presenting a unique opportunity for future, dynamic reinvention.

An array of national and international expert speakers will explore themes of architectural history, historic landscape design, comparative international examples of regeneration, and planned projects for the rejuvenation of Parnell Square and its buildings. The conference will also feature participation from the Rotunda Hospital.

Conference includes lunch and light refreshments.

CPD certificates are issued only to attendees who have purchased CPD tickets.

Rutland (Parnell) Square extracted from 'Dublin from the Spire of Saint George's Church' by James Mahony, 1854

Rutland (Parnell) Square extracted from 'Dublin from the Spire of Saint George's Church' by James Mahony, 1854

Conference Programme                                            

 

08.50 - 09.20  Registration

09.20                      
Welcome & Introduction
Geraldine Walsh, Chief Executive Officer, Dublin Civic Trust

09.30                                  
Opening Address
Paschal Donohoe T.D., Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform              
                                

Session I: Setting The Context      
Chaired by Niall Ó'Donnchú, Assistant Secretary, Dept. Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

09:45                     
Dublin's North Georgian Core – Its Assets & Potential  
James Kelly, Conservation Architect & Chairman, Dublin Civic Trust

10:10                                    
Obstetrics, Spectacle and Pleasure: the Origins of the Rotunda Hospital 
Gary A. Boyd, Head of Architecture, Queen’s University Belfast

10.35
The Rotunda – Past, Present & Future
Sam Coulter-Smith, Former Master of the Rotunda Hospital, 2009-2016

10.55                                    
Discussion

11.05  Tea/Coffee Break

11.35                    
Plain Pomp: the houses of Rutland Square
Christine Casey, Professor in Architectural History, Trinity College Dublin

12.00                                     
The Rotunda Complex – Hidden In Plain View       
Graham Hickey, Conservation Director, Dublin Civic Trust

12.25         
Garden of Remembrance: a symbolic place in 1960s Parnell Square 
Ellen Rowley, Architectural & Cultural Historian      

12:50                                    
Making Dublin great - finding ways to build contemporary architecture in the Georgian core  
Niall McCullough, McCullough Mulvin Architects                                                   

13:10                                    
Discussion

13.20  Lunch

Session II: Looking to the Future  
Chaired by Paraic Fallon, Senior Planner, Dublin City Council

14.20                                   
The Future of Parnell Square – Dublin City Library & Cultural Quarter  
Yvonne Farrell, Director, Grafton Architects

14.50                                  
Reimagining the Pleasure Garden in the 21st Century
Todd Longstaffe-Gowan, Landscape Historian & Designer 

15.20                                     
Reviving the Edinburgh Assembly Rooms & The Piece Hall, Halifax 
Emma Rose Berry, Associate, LDN Architects, Scotland   

15.50
Opportunities for Sustainable Residential Communities in the Historic City Centre                   
Orla Hegarty, Architect & Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, UCD

16:20                            
Debate & Discussion
Chaired by Paraic Fallon, Senior Planner, Dublin City Council

16:40  Close

 

Thermally Upgrading Historic Buildings in the context of Climate Change

Date: Tuesday 13th November 2018

Time: 09:45 - 13:00
(registration from 09:30 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

SPEAKERS

Duncan Stewart, Broadcaster, architect and environmentalist
Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager, Ecological Building Systems

 

PROGRAMME

This half-day seminar will discuss the impact of climate change on Ireland and the scale of the challenge required in decarbonising the country’s building stock and wider society/economy. This places particular challenges on the thermal upgrading of historic buildings, where the use of appropriate materials and space heating solutions are required to respect the special character of traditionally-built structures, both protected and non-protected.

Two leading speakers in their respective fields will explore these issues through a combination of lectures, presentations, product demonstrations and extensive question and answer sessions. The event will be held in the 1840s merchant permises of Dublin Civic Trust, which is undergoing completion of a major conservation works programme, including the use of ‘breathable’ insulating solutions. 

Duncan Stewart is a renowned Irish broadcaster, architect and environmentalist. An award-winning architect and television producer, Duncan has been a leading Irish advocate for environmental, health and conservation issues for over 40 years. His early television programmes ‘Our House’ and ‘About the House’ leaned on his architectural background as he promoted the values of quality Irish craftsmanship, efficient and sustainable materials and the value of energy conservation.

Duncan’s current television programme ‘Eco Eye’, now in its fourteenth series, is driven by his interests in the protection of the environment, Ireland’s biodiversity, supporting local communities and the communication of climate issues.

Niall Crosson is Group Technical Manager at Ecological Building Systems, a leading Irish company supplying products and materials for low energy sustainable buildings. He is a Certified Passivhaus Consultant and a member of the Board of Directors of the Irish Green Building Council. He provides guidance on a number of national standard committees and to many award-winning low-energy projects in Ireland and the UK.

He has also co-authored and authored chapters for a number of low energy building publications including The Passivhaus Handbook and The Passivhaus Designers Manual. Niall provides regular technical contributions to a number of construction publications including The Journal of the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland.

BOOKING CLOSED

 

Calsitherm Climate Board being applied in 18 Ormond Quay Upper replacing modern cement and gypsum-based plasters

Calsitherm Climate Board being applied in 18 Ormond Quay Upper replacing modern cement and gypsum-based plasters

Previous Events

National Biodiversity Week 2018
May Lunchtime Lectures

Hosted by Dublin Civic Trust at 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Free of charge on a first-come basis

The Liffey in the City - wildlife of Dublin’s river

Date: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Time: 13:00 – 14:00
Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Lectures
Niamh Fitzgerald, Birdwatch Ireland

Dr Julian Reynolds, Zoologist, Trinity College Dublin



Greening the City

Date: Friday 25th May 2018
Time: 13:00 – 14:00
Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Lectures
The importance of city trees lecture - Dr John A. McCullen, formerly of OPW

Urban gardening - go green in the city; workshop with Rebecca Jeffares, landscape historian

Dublin's river Liffey

Dublin's river Liffey

Historic Building Site Visit: 1 Capel Street

Date: Tuesday 29th May 2018

Time: 10:00 – 12:00
(registration from 09:45 at the door of 18 Ormond Quay Upper - please note, not 1 Capel Street)

Price: €50

CPD Points: 2

This morning site visit to 1 Capel Street provides a rare opportunity to inspect the interiors of one of Dublin’s most prominent street buildings overlooking Grattan Bridge in the heart of Dublin. Constructed c.1780 and extensively modified in the 1830s, 1 Capel Street was famously captured in an engraving of Essex Bridge (now Grattan Bridge) by James Malton in the 1790s.

The guided site visit, led by its project architect James Kelly of Kelly & Cogan Architects in advance of major conservation works, will provide an opportunity to learn how to read an historic building, its layers of interventions over time, and dealing with challenging conservation and repair issues.

The session will begin with a lecture presentation hosted in 18 Ormond Quay Upper (located a few doors away, where registration at 09.45 also takes place), followed by a guided site tour of 1 Capel Street.

 

Historic Building Site Visit: 3 Henrietta Street

Date: Thursday 17th May 2018

Time: 10:00 – 12:00
(registration from 09:45 at the front door)

Price: €50

CPD Points: 2

This morning site visit is a follow-up visit to the Trust’s successful seminar on the conservation of this landmark Georgian mansion at 3 Henrietta Street held in late 2017.

Since that time, the most ambitious staircase reconstruction of its kind has taken place in the soaring double-height entrance hall which had been removed in the 20th century. The staircase project is one of the most remarkable historic reconstructions ever undertaken in Ireland, involving the structural carcassing of the ‘flying staircase’ based on exacting surviving dimensions, the carving of almost 100 balusters, heavy handrail and dado rail, and the application of salvaged, 18th-century tread-ends. Historic plasterwork has also been conserved and replicated, restoring the architectural coherence of the stair hall.  

This morning visit will allow a unique opportunity to observe the interior of this private house as the staircase is being completed, led by its project conservation architect, James Kelly of Kelly & Cogan Architects and clients, Pat Wigglesworth and Ian Lumley.

Workshop seminar and visit
Lambstongue Window Conservation Specialists

Date: Tuesday 15th May 2018

Time: 10:00 - 13:00
(registration from 09:45 at the front door)

Location: Lambstongue workshop, G7, Chapelizod Industrial Estate, Chapelizod, Dublin 20
(attendees to provide their own transport or car-pool)

Price: €95

CPD Points: 3

This morning seminar provides a stimulating opportunity to visit one of the largest building conservation workshops in Ireland, at the headquarters of Lambstongue, historic window specialists, in Chapelizod.

Lambstongue specialises in the repair and manufacture of traditional timber and metal craftwork with a strong design and conservation sensibility. In addition to the firm’s specialisation in traditional joinery, it has pioneered expertise in the conservation and thermal upgrading of metal doors and windows, working with steel, cast-iron, bronze and leadwork. It is presently involved in the repair and manufacturing of new windows for one of the largest building restoration projects in the UK at the Glasgow School of Art & Design.

This rare opportunity to explore their workshop, with live demonstrations and inspections, including: traditional joinery, sash window repair, glazing, stained glass and leadwork, working with bronze, steel and aluminium, and thermal upgrading.

Mid-morning refreshments provided. Lunch is not included.

 

Insulating Historic Buildings Seminar

Calsitherm Climate Board & Diasen Thermal Plaster Demonstration

Date: Thursday 3rd May 2018

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 at the front door)  

Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €95  

Structured CPD Points: 3

Held in association with Ecological Building Systems Ireland and DB Plaster Natural Building Solutions  

This half-day seminar, hosted in Dublin Civic Trust’s live building conservation project at 18 Ormond Quay Upper, will provide a unique opportunity to observe a live application demonstration of Calsitherm Climate Board and Diasen Thermal Plaster in a brick-built Protected Structure.  

These two open diffusion, ‘breathable’ wall insulations are growing in demand in Ireland as awareness increases about their suitability for use in historic building contexts.

This half-day seminar will include lectures focusing on the properties of each material and cases studies of their use. A live demonstration of their application in the upper floors of 18 Ormond Quay Upper will take place in two rooms where historic plaster finishes have been lost and thermal upgrading of exterior walls is required.  

The seminar will provide an excellent opportunity for exchange and dialogue with suppliers and appliers of the plaster products, and for discussion amongst conservation specialists and practitioners.

Mid-morning refreshments provided. Lunch is not included.

More information on Calsitherm and Diasen can be found here:

Ecological Building Systems Ireland
DB Plaster Natural Building Solutions

BOOKING NOW CLOSED 

Diasen Thermal Plaster using spray application

Diasen Thermal Plaster using spray application

Project 18Ormond Seminar
Conserving a Dublin merchant building 

Date: Thursday 9th November 2017

Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €95

Structured CPD Points: 3

Join us for this half-day seminar exploring the history, conservation philosophy and practical repair techniques being undertaken in the ongoing refurbishment of Dublin Civic Trust’s flagship building at 18 Ormond Quay Upper. The event is the first public opportunity to gain access to this major conservation project on the Liffey quays in the historic heart of Dublin.

18 Ormond Quay Upper and 67 Arran Street East comprise a pair of interlocking period buildings dating to 1843 and 1760 respectively. The first phase of this ambitious project comprises the structural consolidation and refurbishment of the river-fronting building, composed of three storeys of living accommodation above a ground floor shop and basement. It is this part of the building that will form the focus of the seminar.

To date, the project has involved the recording of architectural fabric, securing planning permission for structural repairs and exterior alterations, undertaking structural consolidation of the side wall and shopfront, the repair of facades and brick repointing, and extensive renewal of the interior staircase.

Find out more about the project and the history of the conjoined buildings here.

18 Ormond Quay Upper pictured before and visualised after restoration

18 Ormond Quay Upper pictured before and visualised after restoration

Seminar Content

This interactive morning seminar will be led by Dublin Civic Trust and by the project architect, James Kelly, MRIAI, MRIBA, Specialist Conservation Architect, of Kelly & Cogan Architects. It will provide an opportunity to learn from ongoing works and to observe the structural and material make-up of a typical Dublin street building.

The day will comprise an instructive guided tour, a series of concise lectures, and ample opportunities for discussion, questions and answers.

 

Contributors

James Kelly, Conservation Architect

Nolans Group building contractors

Geraldine Walsh & Graham Hickey, Dublin Civic Trust

 

Themes & Topics

 - Architectural/stylistic analysis

- Structural deficiencies and repair

- Brick repair and repointing, including traditional ‘wigging’

- Masonry cleaning

- Historic joinery repair

Brick cleaning underway using low pressure water application

Brick cleaning underway using low pressure water application

Details

Registration takes place from 09.45 – 10.00.

Proceedings begin at 10.00 sharp and conclude at 13.00.

Places are strictly limited and by advance booking only.

Tea/coffee refreshments will be provided mid-morning. Lunch will not be provided as the seminar will conclude at 13.00. There is a host of good cafes in the vicinity of Ormond Quay.

Importance Notice

Please note that 18 Ormond Quay Upper is an active building site. While every effort will be made to ensure a safe and comfortable visit, all attendees are advised to wear PPE clothing including steel-capped boots and high-visibility vests. PPE clothing will not be provided on-site. Any attendees with mobility impairments should contact Dublin Civic Trust in advance of attendance. Please note that unfortunately wheelchair access cannot be provided.

Pebbledash removal

Pebbledash removal

PREVIOUS EVENTS

3 Henrietta Street Visit

Conserving an 18th-century Georgian mansion  

Date: Tuesday 24th October 2017  

Location: 3 Henrietta Street, Dublin 1 

Price: €95

Structured CPD Points: 3

 

This half-day seminar will provide a unique and exciting opportunity to visit and to learn from the ongoing conservation and refurbishment of one of the grandest private houses in Dublin at Number 3 Henrietta Street. Constructed in the early 1750s as a fashionable town house on the pioneering Georgian street set out by developer Luke Gardiner, the site of the house was originally leased to developer Nathaniel Clements before being passed to John Maxwell, Baron Farnham, who may have built the house itself. Owen Wynn, an MP of Hazlewood, County Sligo, who had married Lord Farnham’s daughter in 1754, inherited the building in 1755, where it remained in family occupation until the 1820s.

The scale and quality of the mansion is outstanding in both national and international contexts. The principal reception rooms on ground and first floors are of a palatial scale, retaining embellished cornices, and lugged door architraves and window cases with egg-and-dart detailing. The first floor rear room is of exceptional quality with a coved Rococo ceiling. The second floor retains some original plaster and joinery features, while the third floor was extensively altered at various dates. The grand staircase and entrance hall that originally scaled two storeys was removed in the 1830s. Later uses included barristers’ chambers and tenement occupation.

The property was recently purchased by its present owners, who are currently undertaking a wholesale repair and conservation of the property, which was in a perilously poor condition, for residential use, to best practice standard.

Seminar Content

This interactive morning seminar will be led by the project architect, James Kelly, MRIAI, MRIBA, Specialist Conservation Architect, of Kelly & Cogan Architects. It will provide an opportunity to learn from ongoing works and to observe the structural and material make-up of a mid 18th-century Dublin town house, applicable to their repair of Georgian buildings across the city.  

The day will comprise an instructive guided tour, a series of concise lectures, and ample opportunities for discussion, questions and answers. Contributors will include:

James Kelly, Conservation Architect

Ian Lumley, co-owner

Patrick Wigglesworth, co-owner and building contractor

Geraldine Walsh & Graham Hickey, Dublin Civic Trust

 

Themes & Topics

Architectural/stylistic analysis

Structural deficiencies and repair

High status plasterwork consolidation, repair and restoration, including cornices and ceilings

Decorative finishes

Brick repair and repointing, including traditional ‘wigging’

Historic joinery repair

Details

Registration takes place from 09.45 – 10.00.

Proceedings begin at 10.00 sharp and conclude at 13.00.

Places are strictly limited and by advance booking only.

Tea/coffee refreshments will be provided mid-morning. Lunch will not be provided as the seminar will conclude at 1pm. We highly recommend the independent Blas Café in the Chocolate Factory, located across the road from Henrietta Street on Kings Inns Street: www.blascafe.ie

Importance Notice

Please note that 3 Henrietta Street is an active building site. While every effort will be made to ensure a safe and comfortable visit, all attendees are advised to wear PPE clothing including steel-capped boots and high-visibility vests. PPE clothing will not be provided on-site.

Any attendees with mobility impairments should contact Dublin Civic Trust in advance of attendance. Please note that unfortunately wheelchair access cannot be provided.

Mountjoy Square Historic Ironwork
Workshop & Seminar

Friday 22nd September 2017

Price: €95.00
Structured CPD Points: 5
Location: 65 Mountjoy Square West, Dublin 1

 

Dublin Civic Trust and The Mountjoy Square Society are pleased to announce details of a one-day seminar and live demonstration workshop showcasing the ongoing repair and conservation of the historic wrought-iron railings of Mountjoy Square, Dublin 1.

This pioneering project, one of the largest of its kind ever undertaken in Ireland, is being led by Dublin City Council’s Parks and Landscape Department as an action of its Mountjoy Square Conservation Plan – a study that was jointly commissioned with the Mountjoy Square Society in 2014.

Mountjoy Square

The wrought-iron railings of Mountjoy Square are the largest single ensemble of Georgian railings surviving within Dublin’s canal ring, erected c.1803 by the Mountjoy Square Commissioners to enclose the square’s central garden. The railings feature an axial arrangement of four centred entrance gates, a Leinster granite plinth wall and distinctive quadrant sweeps to the corners of the square - all originally mounted with a series of 84 ‘globe-iron’ lamp standards,

Unlike other Dublin squares such as Merrion Square and St. Stephen’s Green that were denuded of their original railings in the late 20th century, Mountjoy Square has retained all of its original ironwork – albeit now in an advanced state of disrepair.

Under the direction of master blacksmith Paul Devlin and conservation stonework contractors Cairn Construction, with architectural oversight from Howley Hayes Architects, the railings are currently being systematically conserved to best practice standard – moving clockwise from the Gardiner Street side.

 

Newly restored railings on Mountjoy Square

Newly restored railings on Mountjoy Square

Seminar

This one-day seminar will provide a unique opportunity to showcase the breadth and quality of the works presently being undertaken. It will allow those involved in building conservation, period building maintenance, works specification and interested members of the public to learn at first hand from the works and the experienced contractors involved.

A particular emphasis is being placed on the feasibility of reinstating the 84 'globe-iron' lamp standards that were originally integrated into the railings of Mountjoy Square - as was common to most of Dublin's Georgian squares. Braun Lighting Solutions, international leaders in historic urban lighting design, will give a presentation on successful achievements in this field in Germany and continental Europe. The seminar will also showcase the lamp-iron model that has been developed for Mountjoy Square in a collaboration between Dublin Civic Trust, The Mountjoy Square Society and Dublin City Council Parks Department.  

Details

Hosted in the magnificent 1790s rooms of a newly restored Georgian mansion at 65 Mountjoy Square West, the day takes two parts: a morning seminar of lectures exploring the history, craftsmanship, challenges and design specification of Mountjoy Square and its railings, followed by an afternoon demonstration of live metalworking hosted on-site on the west side of the square.

 

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

09.45 – 10.00
Registration

10.00 – 10.30
Mountjoy Square History & Development
Karin O’Flanagan, The Mountjoy Square Society

10.30 – 11.00
Mountjoy Square Park Conservation Plan & Railings Project
Dublin City Council Parks & Landscape Service

11.00 – 11.30
Refreshments

11.30 – 11.45
Georgian Lighting & Mountjoy Square’s ‘Globe-Irons’
Graham Hickey, Dublin Civic Trust           

11.45 - 12.20
Design-led LED lighting in the Historic Urban Environment
André Braun & Christian Zeher, Braun Lighting Solutions, Berlin

12.20 – 13.00
Mountjoy Square Railings Repair Strategy
Paul Devlin, Blacksmith

13.00 – 14.00
Lunch

14.00 – 16.00
On-site blacksmithing demonstration, west side Mountjoy Square Park
Paul Devlin & colleagues

16.00
Close

Previous course topics and themes

Structural upgrading

Structural Repair of Historic Buildings

Historic Ironwork - History, Identification & Repair

Energy Efficiency in Traditional Buildings

Traditional Windows - History, Repair and Thermal Upgrading

Structural Repairs to Derelict and Ruined Structures

Timber Decay & Damp in Historic Buildings

Historic Decorative Finishes - History, Repair and Reinstatement

Wallpaper in Ireland - History and Conservation

Historic Plaster in Ireland - Walls, Ceilings and Decorative Work

Historic Brickwork - History, Repair, Jointing and Pointing

Fanlights - History, Repair and Maintenance

Traditional Roofing - History, Repair and Conservation

Stonework in Historic Buildings - Repair and Cleaning

Mechanical and Electrical Installations in Historic Buildings

Planning Legislation - Protected Structures & Architectural Conservation Areas

Course leaders and speakers

Ian Hume, former Chief Engineer, Historic England 

Dr Gerald Lynch, Master Bricklayer

Peter Lawson Smith, OBE

Dr Brian Ridout, Ridout Associates

Edward Byrne, Traditional Lime Company

Nicki Matthews, Conservation Officer, Dublin City Council

Richard Ireland, Historic Decorative Plaster, Paint & Finishes Expert

Dr David Mitchell, Director of Conservation, Historic Environment Scotland

Sven Habermann, Manager, Conservation-Letterfrack

Chris Wood, Historic England

Contractors including MacLyn Conservation Joinery and Lambstongue

Programme of events 2017

We will be using out flagship new building conservation project at 18 Ormond Quay Upper in Dublin city centre as a centre of demonstration and learning over the course of 2017-2018.

In this prominently located historic house overlooking the river Liffey, we will be exploring traditional materials and construction, historic design elements and features, and conservation and repair techniques. This will include roofing, plasterwork, joinery and the integration of modern services.

We will be launching our programme of events later in the year. In the meantime, sign up to our newsletter and keep an eye out for social media feeds.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PROJECT 18ORMOND +